Everything’s Up

I had an appointment with my interim diabetes practitioner on Friday afternoon. Dr. K is on mama-leave with her kids, so I’m seeing PA. L, who is an endocrinology physician’s assistant. I had my labs done and everything is up including the a1c. It’s now at 7.4. As much as I’d like to blame it on the Freestyle test strip recall, it’s also due to guessing on carb counts at lunch everyday and eating too many treats at work. We made small changes to my basal rates, bolus rates, and correction factor, but two mornings in a row, I’ve gone low at the all day correction factor of 22. Between 6am and 9am it should probably be closer to 25. It all feels like one big test of trial and error, but at least the snow is melting.

I also donated a pack of unused Levemir pens to the clinic, along with 100 or so used pen needles. Just kidding. They had not been used. They were sealed and all. Since I use a pump, I don’t have a need for the long acting insulin. It’s been sitting patiently in my refrigerator since two Octobers ago. The expiration date is August 2014, so I figured I should let some living being get use out of it before it goes to waste.

I contacted a twin cities dog rescue, and they told me they would be happy to take it. Dogs use the same long acting insulin as humans, albeit in smaller amounts. I noticed there was a diabetic doxie on their site named Junior Mint, and emailed them letting them know that I would be happy to donate the insulin to be used for any dog that needed it, and that if a family adopted a diabetic dog that I would be more than fine with them taking the insulin to ease the initial cost of the adoption.

After consulting my ever wise and patient sister, Beth, I decided I should offer it to the nurse educators at my endocrinology clinic for human use. They have an ’emergency supplies’ area for patients who are in between insurances, aren’t/weren’t covered for health insurance, or don’t have enough money for their prescriptions even if they were covered. The clinic happily accepted it, and I feel good today knowing that the insulin I donated will keep someone from having to urinate 46 times a day, blurred vision, headaches, and a general feeling of malaise.

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